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Welcome to the library subject page for academics, postgraduates and PhD students.

The library is committed to supporting your research activities.  We provide you with access to books, ebooks, journals, eresources and other services and systems that will enhance your research experience.

The world of information seeking and management is fast moving and we want to help enable you to keep up to date with the new services and resources that can enhance your research practice and development.

Individual support and guidance is available for any of the topics presented below. Group sessions are delivered via the Graduate School’s Researcher Development Programme. Workshops can also be requested for bespoke events. The workshops we offer map against the Vitae Researcher Development Framework.

Key Contacts:
  • Useful Resources and Services

    • Use OneSearch to find nearly everything that the library has to offer including print books, electronic books, journals and more…
    • Use the Journals A-Z to find out which journal titles the library subscribes to in print or electronic format.Use the to find out which journal titles the library subscribes to in print or electronic format.
    • Use the Eresources A-Z to find out which journal collections the library subscribes to.
    • Use RefWorks to manage your bibliographic references and produce reference lists and bibliographies.
    • Use Web of Science to access leading scholarly literature and proceedings of international conferences, symposia, seminars, colloquia, workshops, and conventions. Web of Science is particularly useful for citation searching.
    • Use the Library Subject Guides to find out which resources are best for your subject area
    • Use the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database to view the full text other students work from the UK and worldwide.
    • Use this indicative reading list to find out which research methods books are available in the library.
    • Use Insight to discover the research output of University of Cumbria staff and students.

    Services

    • Postgraduate students can use the Get More Books service to tell us if there is a book that would benefit your research and we’ll do our best to buy a copy for the library.
    • Keep up to date by using alerting services Zetoc and Journal TOCS to inform you when new issues of a journal are available or articles containing your key research terms are published.
    • Use the Inter library loans service if the University of Cumbria library does not stock a book or a journal article which you need for private study or research.
    • Use the Sconul Access Scheme to join and borrow from other UK academic libraries.
    • Use ORCID to set yourself up with a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and supports linking between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.

    Wider Resources

    • Use the Archives Hub to explore archive collections held in UK Universities and Colleges.
    • Use The Copac National, Academic and Specialist Library Catalogue for free access to the merged online catalogues of many major University, Specialist, and National Libraries in the UK and Ireland, including the British Library.
    • Use the British Newspaper Archive to access hundreds of historic newspapers from Britain and Ireland.
    • Use EThOS to search through PhD theses from over 100 UK institutions.
    • Use ResearchGate to connect with other researchers in your field.
    • Use SunCat to locate serials held in the UK. The catalogue contains information on both print and electronic serials, including journals, periodicals, newspapers, newsletters, magazines, proceedings, annual reports and other publications of a continuing nature.
  • Methodical literature searching

    What is it?

    Methodical literature searching is the process of choosing the most appropriate sources and applying a methodological approach to your searching.

    Why should you do it?

    A methodical approach to literature searching will ensure that you obtain high quality and focused results that are transparent, rigorous and replicable.

    How do you do it?

    Choose the most appropriate information sources and databases for your project. Use concept maps to develop keywords and apply subject headings, truncation, adjacency searching and wildcards. Understand how to use Boolean operators to combine search sets in databases. Complement your database searching with other searching techniques such as hand-searching and snowballing. Construct and write up a literature search strategy. Perform citation searching in Web of Science. Use RefWorks to save bibliographical details for references.

    Useful guides and resources:

  • Managing your references

    What is it?

    Reference management is about having a system in place so that you can record and access all the bibliographical details for books, journal articles and other sources of literature that you have consulted and used as evidence for your project. Online reference management tools such as Refworks, can provide you with your own personal reference management database.

    Why should you do it?

    It will save you time, help you be organised and keep on top of your research. It will also produce your bibliography!

    How do you do it?

    The University of Cumbria subscribes to the RefWorks online reference management tool. Refworks is used to collect and manage your sources. It will also create your bibliography in the referencing style of your choice.

    Useful guides and resources:

  • Depositing your research in Insight and understanding open access publishing

    What is it?

    Insight is the name of the University of Cumbria’s repository of open access research outputs. Open Access (OA) is the term used to denote that research and scholarly outputs should be discoverable and available in a manner allowing unrestricted access. The University of Cumbria supports the principals of OA.

     

    Why should you do it?

    Insight makes your research outputs open access, ensuring they will be eligible for consideration for the next REF submission. Open access increases knowledge sharing, collaboration and innovation amongst academics.

     

    How do you do it?

    You can easily deposit your research outputs in Insight and the library will perform the copyright checks. For Journal articles and conference proceedings you must deposit the final version of your paper (the version which has been peer-reviewed but hasn’t yet been typeset by the publisher). As a researcher you can search other university open access repositories from around the world to find current research outputs.

    Useful guides and resources:

    Nick Shockey and Jonathan Eisen take us through the world of open access publishing and explain just what it's all about.

     

    People who can support you:

  • Research Data Management

    What is it?

    Research data management (RDM) is the process of looking after your research data.

    Why should you do it?

    Well-managed data is easier to find, understand and analyse and harder to lose. It can also be shared, widening the impact of your research and potentially leading to increased citations.

    How do you do it?

    RDM involves: organising and documenting your data; keeping it safe, secure and backed up; archiving it for the long-term; optionally sharing or publishing it; and planning how you will carry out these activities.

    Useful guides and resources:

    A data management horror story by Karen Hanson, Alisa Surkis and Karen Yacobucci. This is what shouldn't happen when a researcher makes a data sharing request! 

  • Measuring Research impact: Bibliometrics

    What is it?

    Bibliometrics is the quantitative analysis of research literature, based upon citations, and can be used to evaluate the impact on the academic community of a research paper, an individual researcher, a research group or institution, or a journal.

     

    Why should you do it?

    Bibliometrics can be used to identify top performing journals in a subject area, in order to: decide where to publish: learn more about a subject area or identify emerging areas of research. However, bibliometrics and impact factors are not necessarily a measure of quality, nor are they relevant for all subject areas and must be considered carefully and in context.

     

    How do you do it?

    At the University of Cumbria, the main citation tool is the Web of Science. Web of Science can provide article level citation data. The Journal Citation Reports (JCR), contained in Web of Science will provide you journal level metrics. Google Scholar also offers some citation searching and journal level metrics.

     

    Useful guides and resources:

    In this short video, Prof John Walsh from the School of Geological Sciences at University College Dublin discusses some the limitations that they have encountered in using Bibliometrics in their field

  • ORCID - Enhancing your online research profile

    What is it?

    An ORCID identifier or ORCID iD is a 16-character identifier that can be used to clearly identify you and not another researcher by a similar name - as the author/owner of an academic output or activity.

    Why should you do it?

    It is unlikely that your name is unique, you may wish to change your name at some time, and you may have publications that use different variants of your name first name and initials.

    This means that citations to your papers could get lost and you could be credited with citations from the wrong papers. By tying your publications and research outputs to your ORCID iD, they become more discoverable.

    By signing up for an ORCID identifier, you have one identifier that will belong only to you and that you can keep throughout your academic career, regardless of the institution at which you work.

    How do you do it?

    It is very easy to sign up for an ORCID iD

    • Register for your ORCID Identifier (it only takes a minute)
    • Add information about you - employment, education - and import your articles, books, grants, datasets and more
    • Use your ORCID iD for your deposits in Insight, on your webpage and in your research and scholarly activities

     

    Useful video to explain how having an ORCID iD can help you as a researcher