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Critical writing

Your ability to write in a critical academic style will be assessed continuously on your degree programme. So what is it?

Quick Guide to Academic Writing

When assessing other people's writing, shows is seen as positive as it reports an observation or finding as a proven fact. The use of concludes is seen as neutral. However, claims or presumes disassociates the writer from the position of the author cited. This then allows the writer to establish a critical perspective and follow with a counter argument.

Read our signposting conclusions for more advice and guidance.

Useful verbs for reporting other writers' findings
Acknowledges
Admits
Agrees
Alleges
Argues
Assumes
Believes
Challenges
Claims
Classifies
Comments
Concentrates on
Concludes
Considers
Criticises
Defines
Demonstrates
Depicts
Determines
Discovers
Emphasises
Establishes
Explains
Explores
Expresses
Finds
Focuses
Highlights
Hypothesises

Identifies
Implies
Indicates
Interprets
Makes the point
Maintains
Notes
Observes
Predicts
Presumes
Proves
Proposes
Provides evidence for
Questions
Recognises
Reports
Seeks to explain
Seeks to identify
Shows
Signals
States
Studies
Suggests
Tries to identify
Sums up
Underlines
Views
Wonders

 

What is critical writing?

I keep using 'states' when presenting the work of authors, what else can I use?

Can I include long quotations in my essay?

What should be included in a conclusion?

 

Our critical writing podcast will give you a greater insight into this complex issue and suggest some strategies to help you develop your skills.

Transcript